The use of labeling to communicate detailed graphics in a non-visual environment

Hesham M. Kamel, James A. Landay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The inherently visual nature of Graphical User Interfaces often makes it difficult for visually impaired computer users to access graphical information. We introduce a labeling method that can be used to communicate graphical information between blind and sighted people. Our early pilot study showed that our labeling method enabled visually impaired participants to comprehend meaningful drawings. This labeling method is an extension of the Integrated Communication 2 Draw (IC2D), a drawing program for the visually impaired that uses keyboard and audio feedback.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI'01 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA'01
Pages243-244
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2001
EventConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2001 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Mar 31 2001Apr 5 2001

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

OtherConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2001
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period3/31/014/5/01

Keywords

  • Audio feedback
  • Blind
  • Drawing
  • Graphical labeling
  • IC2D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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