The role of moral objections to suicide in the assessment of suicidal patients

Dana Lizardi, Kanita Dervic, Michael F. Grunebaum, Ainsley K. Burke, J. John Mann, Maria A. Oquendo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Moral and religious objections to suicide (MOS) are reported to be associated with less suicidal behavior in depressed patients, and are proposed to act as a protective factor against suicidal behavior. It is unclear whether MOS are a protective factor against suicide attempt per se, or if this effect is mediated through other variables. Method: Depressed inpatients (n = 265) reporting low or high MOS were compared on history of suicidal behaviour, demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: Patients with low MOS had significantly more lifetime suicide attempts, were more often without religious affiliation, had greater depression severity, hopelessness and trait impulsivity, less anxiety and fewer reasons for living. Logistic regression revealed that lower MOS was independently associated with suicide attempt. Conclusions: Moral and religious objections to suicide may serve as a protective factor against suicidal acts given their unique association with less suicidal behavior in depressed inpatients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-821
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Moral objections
  • Protective factors
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of moral objections to suicide in the assessment of suicidal patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this