The moderating role of gender in the relationship between religiosity and mental health in a sample of black American college students

Kevin O.Neal Cokley, Samuel Beasley, Andrea Holman, Collette Chapman-Hilliard, Brettjet Cody, Bianca Jones, Shannon McClain, Desire Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the current study gender was tested as a moderator of the relationship between religiosity and mental health among 218 black American college students. It was hypothesised that black women would be higher in religious engagement than black men, and that gender would moderate the relationship between religiosity and mental health. Contrary to hypotheses, no significant gender differences in religious engagement were found. However, moderated multiple regression analyses revealed that increases in religious engagement were predictive of lower anxiety and depression for black women, but higher anxiety for black men. Implications for addressing religion when counselling black college students are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-462
Number of pages18
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • black American
  • depression
  • gender
  • mental health
  • religiosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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