The influence of velocity-specific resistance training on the in vivo torque-velocity relationship and the cross-sectional area of quadriceps femoris

S. R. Petersen, K. M. Bagnall, H. A. Wenger, D. C. Reid, W. R. Castor, H. A. Quinney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to investigate the effects of velocity-specific resistance training, 30 healthy, male varsity athletes were assigned to either high (HVR) or low (LVR) velocity training or control (CG) groups. Subjects completed two 20-sec sets of maximal exercise at each of six hydraulic resistance stations for the lower limb. Resistances were adjusted as necessary to maintain consistent average angular velocities of approximately 1.05 and 3.14 rad/sec for the LVR and HVR groups, respectively. Subjects trained on alternate days for 6 weeks, completing either two (weeks 1 and 2) or three (weeks 3-6) circuits of the six stations each session. Peak knee extension torques were improved (p <0.05) for the LVR group at all of seven angular velocities tested between 1.05 and 4.19 rad/sec. Improvements (p <0.05) were also observed for the HVR group, but only at angular velocities of 2.62, 3.14, 3.66, and 4.19 rad/sec. Cross-sectional area of the quadriceps femoris muscle group obtained from serial computer tomography (CT) scans was increased (p <0.05) for both training groups. No significant changes in either strength or cross-sectional area were observed for control subjects. These results indicate that while both of the training programs resulted in increased cross-sectional area of the knee extensors, the observed changes in strength performance are likely due to other factors which may be mediated by the different training velocities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)456-462
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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