The Impact of Leadership Style on Moral Identity and Subsequent In-Role Performance: A Moderated Mediation Analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of supervisors’ servant leadership (i.e., leadership that starts with a leader who wants to serve) on supervisees’ moral identity and subsequent in-role performance. Data from 226 supervisor–supervisee dyads were collected from several domestic and multinational companies operating in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to confirm the factorial validity of the measures that were employed in this study. The hypothesized moderated mediation model was tested using hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Based on social learning theory, the results showed that supervisees’ moral identity served as the psychological mediating mechanism through which supervisors’ servant leadership led to supervisees’ increased in-role performance. Furthermore, the results also supported supervisees’ avoidance orientation as the dispositional boundary condition of this mediating effect. This study contributes to both the servant leadership and moral identity literatures by addressing questions with useful theoretical and managerial implications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)613-627
Number of pages15
JournalEthics and Behavior
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 17 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • avoidance orientation
  • in-role performance
  • moral identity
  • servant leadership

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Impact of Leadership Style on Moral Identity and Subsequent In-Role Performance: A Moderated Mediation Analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this