The Effectiveness of Peer-Delivered Services in the Management of Mental Health Conditions: a Meta-Analysis of Studies from Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Zahir Vally, Lameze Abrahams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested that peers, or lay persons, should be more readily utilized in the provision of some mental health services, particularly in poor contexts where limited resources invariably result in many clients not receiving suitable and timely services. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted of all studies where peers were trained to implement some form of mental health service delivery to individuals resident in low- and middle-income countries (LMICS). The analyses of 14 eligible studies (n = 18,411 participants) revealed that depression and post-traumatic stress (PTS) were the most frequently assessed outcome measures. Overall effect sizes of small and medium magnitude were yielded for depression and PTS, respectively, suggesting that services delivered by peers may be efficacious in LMICS. While these results are encouraging, they are preliminary, and recommendations are made relating to the selection, training, and supervision of peers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-344
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal for the Advancement of Counselling
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Consumer
  • Low-and-middle-income countries
  • Mental health
  • Mentor
  • Meta-analysis
  • Peer
  • Poor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

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