Spoligotyping of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Ethiopia

B. Diriba, T. Berkessa, G. Mamo, Y. Tedla, Gobena Ameni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SETTING: St Peter Tuberculosis (TB) Specialized Hospital and the Aklilu Lemma Institute of Pathobiology, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. OBJECTIVE: To genotype multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) isolates and assess the magnitude of their clustering. DESIGN: A total of 183 consecutive MDR-TB isolates collected between September 2009 and February 2012 were characterised using molecular typing. Prior to the study, the isolates were confirmed as MDR-TB using GenoType® MTBDRplus. Recent transmission index was used to analyse the clusters. RESULTS: Spoligotyping identified 43 different patterns, of which 17 consisted of at least two isolates forming clusters, while 26 had only a single isolate. The most frequent patterns were spoligo international typing (SIT) number 21 and 149. Twenty-four patterns did not match existing patterns in the SpolDB4 database. The strains belonged to three lineages, the predominant lineages being Euro-American and Indo-Oceanic, each consisting of 65 isolates. High proportions (86%) of patients were infected with clustered strains, suggesting probable recent transmission of MDR-TB in the study area. CONCLUSION: The observation of cluster formation of the spoligotype patterns of MDR-TB isolates could suggest transmission of MDR-TB strains among the population, thus warranting further attention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-250+i
JournalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Clustering
  • Drug resistance
  • Lineage
  • Recent transmission
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Infectious Diseases

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