Quantitative determinations of levofloxacin and rifampicin in pharmaceutical and urine samples using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

A. A. Salem, H. A. Mossa, B. N. Barsoum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid, specific and simple methods for determining levofloxacin and rifampicin antibiotic drugs in pharmaceutical and human urine samples were developed. The methods are based on 1H NMR spectroscopy using maleic acid as an internal standard and DMSO-d6 as NMR solvent. Integration of NMR signals at 8.9 and 8.2 ppm were, respectively, used for calculating the concentration of levofloxacin and rifampicin drugs per unit dose. Maleic acid signal at 6.2 ppm was used as the reference signal. Recoveries of (97.0-99.4) ± 0.5 and (98.3-99.7) ± 1.08% were obtained for pure levofloxacin and rifampicin, respectively. Corresponding recoveries of 98.5-100.3 and 96.8-100.0 were, respectively, obtained in pharmaceutical capsules and urine samples. Relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) values ≤2.7 were obtained for analyzed drugs in pure, pharmaceutical and urine samples. Statistical Student's t-test gave t-values ≤2.87 indicating insignificant difference between the real and the experimental values at the 95% confidence level. F-test revealed insignificant difference in precisions between the developed NMR methods and each of fluorimetric and HPLC methods for analyzing levofloxacin and rifampicin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)466-472
Number of pages7
JournalSpectrochimica Acta - Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy
Volume62
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

Keywords

  • Levofloxacin
  • NMR spectroscopy
  • Quantitative analysis
  • Rifampicin
  • Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation
  • Spectroscopy

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