Perspectives on the use and risk of adverse events associated with cytokine-storm targeting antibodies and challenges associated with development of novel monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of COVID-19 clinical cases

Aishwarya Mary Johnson, Robert Barigye, Hariharan Saminathan

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that lacks globally accessible effective antivirals or extensively available vaccines. Numerous clinical trials are exploring the applicability of repurposed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting cytokines that cause adverse COVID-19-related pathologies, and novel mAbs directly targeting SARS-CoV-2. However, comorbidities and the incidence of cytokine storm (CS)-associated pathological complexities in some COVID-19 patients may limit the clinical use of these drugs. Additionally, CS-targeting mAbs have the potential to cause adverse events that restrict their applicability in patients with comorbidities. Novel mAbs targeting SARS-CoV-2 require pharmacological and toxicological characterization before a marketable product becomes available. The affordability of novel mAbs across the global economic spectrum may seriously limit their accessibility. This review presents a perspective on antibody-based research efforts and their limitations for COVID-19.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2824-2840
Number of pages17
JournalHuman Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • adverse effects
  • immunotherapeutics
  • monoclonal antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

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