Molecular basis of the anti-diabetic properties of camel milk through profiling of its bioactive peptides on dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) and insulin receptor activity

Arshida Ashraf, Priti Mudgil, Abdulrasheed Palakkott, Rabah Iratni, Chee Yuen Gan, Sajid Maqsood, Mohammed Akli Ayoub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The molecular basis of the anti-diabetic properties of camel milk reported in many studies and the exact active agent are still elusive. Recent studies have reported effects of camel whey proteins (CWP) and their hydrolysates (CWPH) on the activities of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) and the human insulin receptor (hIR). In this study, CWPH were generated, screened for DPP-IV binding in silico and inhibitory activity in vitro, and processed for peptide identification. Furthermore, pharmacological action of intact CWP and their selected hydrolysates on hIR activity and signaling and on glucose uptake were investigated in cell lines. Results showed inhibition of DPP-IV by CWP and CWPH and their positive action on hIR activation and glucose uptake. Interestingly, the combination of CWP or CWPH with insulin revealed a positive allosteric modulation of hIR that was drastically reduced by the competitive hIR antagonist. Our data reveal for the first time the profiling and pharmacological actions of CWP and their derived peptides fractions on hIR and their pathways involved in glucose homeostasis. This sheds more light on the anti-diabetic properties of camel milk by providing the molecular basis for the potential use of camel milk in the management of diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-77
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume104
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • DPP-IV
  • camel milk
  • diabetes
  • insulin receptor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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