High-resolution mapping of in vivo gastrointestinal slow wave activity using flexible printed circuit board electrodes: Methodology and validation

Peng Du, G. O'Grady, J. U. Egbuji, W. J. Lammers, D. Budgett, P. Nielsen, J. A. Windsor, A. J. Pullan, L. K. Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-resolution, multi-electrode mapping is providing valuable new insights into the origin, propagation, and abnormalities of gastrointestinal (GI) slow wave activity. Construction of high-resolution mapping arrays has previously been a costly and time-consuming endeavor, and existing arrays are not well suited for human research as they cannot be reliably and repeatedly sterilized. The design and fabrication of a new flexible printed circuit board (PCB) multi-electrode array that is suitable for GI mapping is presented, together with its in vivo validation in a porcine model. A modified methodology for characterizing slow waves and forming spatiotemporal activation maps showing slow waves propagation is also demonstrated. The validation study found that flexible PCB electrode arrays are able to reliably record gastric slow wave activity with signal quality near that achieved by traditional epoxy resin-embedded silver electrode arrays. Flexible PCB electrode arrays provide a clinically viable alternative to previously published devices for the high-resolution mapping of GI slow wave activity. PCBs may be mass-produced at low cost, and are easily sterilized and potentially disposable, making them ideally suited to intra-operative human use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)839-846
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Activation map
  • Gastric electrical activity
  • PCB
  • Smooth muscle
  • Velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'High-resolution mapping of in vivo gastrointestinal slow wave activity using flexible printed circuit board electrodes: Methodology and validation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this