Heart rate, body temperature and physical activity are variously affected during insulin treatment in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rat

F. C. Howarth, M. Jacobson, M. Shafiullah, M. Ljubisavljevic, E. Adeghate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of cardiovascular complications including impaired cardiac muscle function. The effects of insulin treatment on heart rate, body temperature and physical activity in the alloxan (ALX)-induced diabetic rat were investigated using in vivo biotelemetry techniques. The electrocardiogram, physical activity and body temperature were recorded in vivo with a biotelemetry system for 10 days before ALX treatment, for 20 days following administration of ALX (120 mg/kg) and thereafter, for 15 days whilst rats received daily insulin. Heart rate declined rapidly after administration of ALX. Pre-ALX heart rate was 321±9 beats per minute, falling to 285±12 beats per minute 15-20 days after ALX and recovering to 331±10 beats per minute 5-10 days after commencement of insulin. Heart rate variability declined and PQ, QRS and QT intervals were prolonged after administration of ALX. Physical activity and body temperature declined after administration of ALX. Pre-ALX body temperature was 37.6±0.1 °C, falling to 37.3±0.1 °C 15-20 days after ALX and recovering to 37.8±0.1 °C 5-10 days after commencement insulin. ALX-induced diabetes is associated with disturbances in heart rhythm, physical activity and body temperature that are variously affected during insulin treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-73
Number of pages9
JournalPhysiological Research
Volume60
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • Alloxan
  • Body temperature
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Heart rate
  • Insulin
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

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