Health-promoting benefits of low-fat akawi cheese made by exopolysaccharide-producing probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from camel milk

Ayesha S. Al-Dhaheri, Reem Al-Hemeiri, Jaleel Kizhakkayil, Anas Al-Nabulsi, Aisha Abushelaibi, Nagendra P. Shah, Mutamed Ayyash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria isolated from camel milk exhibit remarkable probiotic and exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing characteristics. The health-promoting benefits of exopolysaccharide-producing probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from camel milk used for making low-fat akawi cheese were investigated. Three low-fat akawi cheeses were made using traditional culture (non-EPS-producing, EPS), commercial EPS-producing (MEPS+), and camel milk EPS-producing (CEPS+) cultures. α-Amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, antioxidant activities, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition, and antiproliferative activity were determined. Cheese made with CEPS+ culture exhibited comparable α-amylase inhibition to that of cheeses made with MEPS+. Scavenging rates of cheese made with EPS+ cultures were higher than those of cheese made with EPS cultures. The percentage of α-glucosidase inhibition ranged from >45% at 0 d to ∼55% at 21 d of storage. After 7 d of storage, the scavenging rate in CEPS+ cheese increased >60% by ABTS assay [2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] and >20% by DPPH assay (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl). Throughout storage, cheese made with EPS+ cultures showed higher ACE-inhibition activity compared with EPS cultures. Cheese made with CEPS+ showed ACE inhibition >70% after 7 d of storage. Antiproliferation activity of CEPS+ cheese increased from 38 to 48% during 7 d of storage and was maintained above 45% with prolonged storage. Low-fat akawi cheese produced with these cultures exhibited similar or greater health-promoting benefits compared with cheese made using commercial starter cultures. Therefore, incorporation of these cultures in food is promising for commercial uses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7771-7779
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Dairy Science
Volume100
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • antiproliferative
  • exopolysaccharide (EPS)
  • health-promoting benefit
  • probiotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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