Explaining the entrepreneurial intentions of employees: The roles of societal norms, work-related creativity and personal resources

Poh Yen Ng, Dirk De Clercq

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article addresses the important question of why those in paid employment might be hesitant to start their own businesses. In particular, we predict how diminished work-related creativity of employees might mediate the relationship between their perceptions that societal norms do not support initiative taking and their own entrepreneurial intentions. In addition, we consider how risk tolerance and passion for work might buffer this process. Survey data, collected among public-sector employees in the United Arabic Emirates, confirm these predictions with the exception of indications for a buffering role of passion for work. For entrepreneurship stakeholders, this research reveals a critical factor – a diminished propensity to generate new ideas at work – by which employee beliefs about limited normative support for enterprising efforts may escalate into a reluctance to consider an entrepreneurial career. It also identifies how this process can be muted when employees are willing to take risks.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Small Business Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • conservation of resources theory
  • entrepreneurial intentions
  • normative adversity
  • passion for work
  • risk tolerance
  • work-related creativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management

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