Experimental in-plane performance of insulated concrete and brick masonry wall panels retrofitted using polymer composites

Najif Ismail, Tamer El-Maaddawy, Amanullah Najmal, Nouman Khattak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Masonry infilled reinforced concrete frame buildings built prior to the introduction of modern seismic provisions have been observed to undergo damage in and around the masonry infill walls during most recent moderate to severe earthquakes. Fibre reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) is one of several retrofitting options available to limit such earthquake induced damage to infill walls. An experimental program was undertaken herein to experimentally investigate the effectiveness of FRCM as a strengthening solution for vintage (i.e. Built between 1880 and 1930) un-reinforced brick masonry (URM) and insulated concrete masonry (IMU) infill walls. A total of 16 masonry assemblages were tested under in-plane diagonal load, of these 8 were constructed replicating vintage URM whereas the remainder were constructed using modern IMU. IMU is a preferred masonry type in hot and humid regions owing to its superior insulting capability. Different polymer fabrics (i.e., carbon, glass and basalt) were applied over both faces of test walls, with two replicate test walls receiving the same FRCM strengthening details. One test wall of each masonry type was tested as-built to serve as a control specimen for comparison. One wall of each masonry type received two layers of basalt FRCM. The investigated aspects included stress-strain behaviour, stiffness, and ductility. Shear strength increment observed due to single layer of FRCM application was 422-778% for vintage URM and 307-415% for modern IMU. FRCM also substantially increased the ductility capacity of the masonry assemblages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalBulletin of the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

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