Electrophysiologic mapping to determine the mechanism of experimental ventricular tachycardia initiated by premature impulses. Experimental approach and initial results demonstrating reentrant excitation

Andrew L. Wit, Maurits A. Allessie, Felix I.M. Bonke, Wim Lammers, Joep Smeets, John J. Fenoglio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

233 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epicardial activation patterns were determined during repetitive responses and nonsustained and sustained ventricular tachycardias induced by premature impulses in infarcted canine hearts. A multiplexing system enabled recordings to be obtained from up to 192 electrodes simultaneously either from the entire epicardial surface with a sock electrode array or only from the sheet of epicardial muscle that survives over the infarcts, with a plaque electrode array. In hearts with an infarct caused by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the earliest epicardial excitation during nonsustained tachycardias occurred on the anterior left ventricle at the border of the infarcted region and in epicardial muscle surviving over the infarcted region. Circuituous conduction patterns leading to reentry occurred in the epicardial muscle over the infarct and probably caused the arrhythmias. During sustained tachycardia in hearts with an infarct caused either by permanent or temporary occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the earliest epicardial excitation also occurred at the border of the infarcted region, but there was no evidence of reentry in the surviving epicardial muscle.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-185
Number of pages20
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1982
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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