Effect of fiber-reinforced polymer wraps on corrosion activity and concrete cracking in chloride-contaminated concrete cylinders

Tamer El Maaddawy, Ali Chahrour, Khaled Soudki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an experimental study designed to investigate the effect of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) wraps on corrosion activity and concrete cracking in chloride-contaminated concrete cylinders. Thirty-five concrete cylinders, each having 102 mm diameter and 204 mm height, concentrically reinforced with one steel reinforcing bar, were subjected to accelerated corrosion exposure for 80 days. Test parameters included level of applied potential, presence of FRP wraps, and bar diameter. The corresponding current and concrete expansion were continuously monitored throughout the corrosion exposure. At the end of the test, the steel bars were extracted, cleaned of rust, and weighed to determine the actual steel mass loss. The results showed that, for the same applied fixed potential, FRP wraps effectively reduced the corresponding current, the concrete expansion, and the steel mass loss. For the same applied potential, the current density increased as the bar diameter decreased. For the same corrosion depth, the circumferential expansion of the cylinder caused by corrosion decreased as the concrete cover-to-bar diameter ratio (c/d) increased.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-147
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Composites for Construction
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Keywords

  • Chlorides
  • Concrete
  • Corrosion
  • Cracking
  • Cylinders
  • Fiber reinforced polymers
  • Steel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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