Do doctoral training programmes actively promote a culture of self-care among clinical and counselling psychology trainees?

Zahir Vally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite frequent calls for the importance of self-care among both novice and practicing psychologists, evidence suggests that training institutions have done little to actively promote a culture of self-care among trainees. The current study examined self-care-related policies and practices in all the clinical and counselling psychology graduate programmes currently accredited by the British Psychological Society. Training handbooks and related programme material were evaluated for a mention of search terms related to self-care. Of the 46 programmes sampled, material was available online for 43 (93.5%) of them. “Personal development” was the most frequently occurring search term. Most of the programme material was well-developed and detailed, providing comprehensive information relating to self-care. Program material are evaluated and their strengths highlighted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)635-644
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Guidance and Counselling
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 3 2019

Keywords

  • Self-care
  • personal development
  • reflective practice
  • support
  • trainee

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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