Consistency of immigrant suicide rates in Austria with country-of-birth suicide rates: A role for genetic risk factors for suicide?

Martin Voracek, Lisa Mariella Loibl, Kanita Dervic, Nestor D. Kapusta, Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, Gernot Sonneck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multifaceted evidence (family, twin, adoption, molecular genetic, geographic, and surname studies of suicide) suggests genetic risk factors for suicide. The migrant study design is also informative in this context, but underused. In particular, immigrant studies of suicide with a continental European host country are unavailable. The correspondence of suicide prevalence among 22 immigrant groups in Austria (1970-2006) with those of the homelands during the same period was analyzed. Immigrant and homeland suicide rates were significantly positively associated. Controls for age of suicide victim, immigrant group size, national pride, and quality of life in the homelands left the finding essentially unchanged. This correspondence of immigrant and country-of-birth suicide rates is consistent with the assumption of population differences in the prevalence of genetic risk factors for suicide, for which there is emerging evidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-289
Number of pages4
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume170
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 30 2009

Keywords

  • Austria
  • Genetic epidemiology
  • Genetics
  • Immigrants
  • Migrant study
  • Risk factors
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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