Comparative studies of four different phenolic compounds on in vitro antioxidative activity and the preventive effect on lipid oxidation of fish oil emulsion and fish mince

Sajid Maqsood, Soottawat Benjakul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

244 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antioxidative activities of different phenolic compounds (catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid and tannic acid) at various levels were determined by different assays. Among all the phenolic compounds tested, tannic acid exhibited the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activities and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Nevertheless, catechin showed the highest metal chelating activity (P < 0.05), whereas caffeic acid had the highest lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitory activity (P < 0.05). The impact of different phenolic compounds at a level of 100 mg/l on lipid oxidation of menhaden oil-in-water emulsion and mackerel mince was investigated. Tannic acid showed the highest efficacy in retardation of lipid oxidation for both model systems as evidenced by the lower peroxide value (PV), conjugated diene (CD) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) values. This was also related with the lower non-heme iron content in tannic acid treated samples. Tannic acid was therefore considered as the most potential natural antioxidant for controlling oxidation of fish oil-in-water emulsion and fish mince, whereas ferulic acid seemed to possess the lowest preventive effect on lipid oxidation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-132
Number of pages10
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antioxidant activity
  • Emulsion
  • Fish mince
  • Fish oil
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Lipoxygenase
  • Phenolic compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Food Science

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