Chemical control of black scorch disease on date palm caused by the fungal pathogen Thielaviopsis punctulata in United Arab Emirates

Esam Eldin Saeed, Arjun Sham, Khaled El-Tarabily, Firas Abu Elsamen, Rabah Iratni, Synan F. Abuqamar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the most important plants grown for its edible fruit. Palm diseases are among the major factors affecting its growth and productivity. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the causal agent of black scorch on date palm was found to be Thielaviopsis punctulata. The pathogen was isolated from all tissues of diseased trees affected by the virulent T. punctulata. Depending on the severity of the infection, symptoms included tissue necrosis, wilting, neck bending, death of terminal buds, and eventual plant mortality. This fungus, which was consistently isolated on potato dextrose agar from infected tissues, produced two types of conidia: the thick-walled aleuroconidia (chlamydospores) and phialoconidia (endoconidia). In addition, all target regions of 5.8S ribosomal RNA, 28S ribosomal DNA, β-tubulin, and transcription elongation factor 1-α genes of the pathogen were amplified using polymerase chain reaction. We also found that the fungicide Score inhibited the mycelial growth of T. punctulata both in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, the morphology of the fruiting structures, pathogenicity tests, and molecular identification confirmed that the causal agent of symptomatic tissues is T. punctulata. This is the first report of the black scorch disease and the fungus T. punctulata on date palm in the UAE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2370-2376
Number of pages7
JournalPlant Disease
Volume100
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Chemical control of black scorch disease on date palm caused by the fungal pathogen Thielaviopsis punctulata in United Arab Emirates'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this