Assessing Protective Factors for Violence Risk in U.K. General Mental Health Services Using the Structured Assessment of Protective Factors

Alina Haines, Andrew Brown, Syed Fahad Javaid, Fayyaz Khan, Steve Noblett, Oladipupo Omodunbi, Khurram Sadiq, Wahid Zaman, Richard Whittington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Violence risk assessment and management are key tasks in mental health services and should be guided by validated instruments covering both risk and protective factors. This article is part of an international effort to validate the Structured Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF) for violence. The SAPROF, Historical, Clinical, Risk Management–20 (HCR-20) and the Psychopathy Checklist–Screening Version (PCL-SV) were administered in a sample of 261 patients in U.K. forensic, general inpatient, and community mental health settings. There was significant variation between these groups on SAPROF scores with fewer protective factors in the forensic group. The prospective validity of the SAPROF for nonviolence in the general inpatient and community samples was moderate (area under the curve [AUC] =.60). Adoption of the SAPROF or similar instruments as a supplement to risk-focused assessments has the potential to improve awareness of protective factors and enhance therapeutic engagement in a range of mental health services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3965-3983
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Volume62
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • mental health services
  • protective factors
  • risk assessment
  • risk violence
  • structured professional judgment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

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