Analysis of genetic variation in natural populations of Medicago truncatula of southern Tunisian ecological areas, using morphological traits and SSR markers

Soumaya Arraouadi, Mounawer Badri, Cheruth Abdul Jaleel, Naceur Djébali, Houcine Ilahi, Thierry Huguet, Mohamed Elarbi Aouani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used 19 quantitative traits and 14 microsatellite markers (SSRs) to analyze the genetic variation in four natural populations of the model legume Medicago truncatula sampled in southern Tunisia. The greatest genetic variation of quantitative traits and molecular markers occurred within populations (>71%). In contrast to quantitative population differentiation (QST=0.09), a high level of molecular differentiation (FST=0.23) was found among populations. The majority of quantitative traits exhibited QST values significantly less than FST values, suggesting that selection may be acting to suppress differentiation for these traits. There was no significant correlation between genetic variation of quantitative traits and molecular markers within populations. On the other hand, significant correlations were found between measured quantitative characters and the site-of-origin environmental factors. The eco-geographical factors with the greatest influence on the variation of measured traits among populations were altitude, followed by soil texture, assimilated phosphorus (P2O5) and organic matter. Nevertheless, there were no consistent patterns of associations between gene diversity (He) and eco-geographical factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-132
Number of pages11
JournalTropical Plant Biology
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Eco-geographical factors
  • F
  • Genetic variation
  • M. truncatula
  • Q
  • Quantitative traits
  • SSR markers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Plant Science

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Analysis of genetic variation in natural populations of Medicago truncatula of southern Tunisian ecological areas, using morphological traits and SSR markers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this