Age-Related Sex Differences in Clinical Presentation, Management, and Outcomes in ST-Segment–Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Pooled Analysis of 15 532 Patients From 7 Arabian Gulf Registries

Abdulla Shehab, Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula, Khalid F. Alhabib, Anhar Ullah, Jassim Al Suwaidi, Wael Almahmeed, Hussam AlFaleh, Mohammad Zubaid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: No studies from the Arabian Gulf region have taken age into account when examining sex differences in ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) presentation and outcomes. We examined the relationship between sex differences and presenting characteristics, revascularization procedures, and in-hospital mortality after accounting for age in patients hospitalized with STEMI in the Arabian Gulf region from 2005 to 2017. Methods and Results: This study was a pooled analysis of 31 620 patients with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome enrolled in 7 Arabian Gulf registries. Of these, 15 532 patients aged ≥18 years were hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of STEMI. A multiple variable regression model was used to assess sex differences in revascularization, in-hospital mortality, and 1-year mortality. Odds ratios and 95% CIs were calculated. Women were, on average, 8.5 years older than men (mean age: 61.7 versus 53.2 years; absolute standard mean difference: 68.9%). The age-stratified analysis showed that younger women (aged <65 years) with STEMI were more likely to seek acute medical care and were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapies or primary percutaneous coronary intervention and guideline-recommended pharmacotherapy than men. Women had higher crude in-hospital mortality than men, driven mainly by younger age (46–55 years, odds ratio: 2.60 [95% CI, 1.80–3.7]; P<0.001; 56–65 years, odds ratio: 2.32 [95% CI, 1.75–3.08]; P<0.001; and 66–75 years, odds ratio: 1.79 [95% CI, 1.33–2.41]; P<0.001). Younger women had higher adjusted in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates than younger men (P<0.001). Conclusions: Younger women (aged ≤65 years) with STEMI were less likely to receive guideline-recommended pharmacotherapy and revascularization than younger men during hospitalization and had higher in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere013880
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 18 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Middle East
  • STEMI
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • hospitalization
  • mortality
  • myocardial infarction
  • sex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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